Difference between revisions of "Articles on AI and ethics/society"

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* Wachter et al.'s 2016 report arguing that current EU legislation providing a 'right to explanation' of automated decision mechanisms is insufficient, and calling for a watchdog to assess whether such decisions are discriminatory: [https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2903469 Why a Right to Explanation of Automated Decision-Making Does Not Exist in the General Data Protection Regulation]. (Alan Turing Institute / University of Oxford)
 
* Wachter et al.'s 2016 report arguing that current EU legislation providing a 'right to explanation' of automated decision mechanisms is insufficient, and calling for a watchdog to assess whether such decisions are discriminatory: [https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2903469 Why a Right to Explanation of Automated Decision-Making Does Not Exist in the General Data Protection Regulation]. (Alan Turing Institute / University of Oxford)
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== Articles relating to bias / discrimination in AI ==
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== Discussions of the impact on people of AI ==  
 
== Discussions of the impact on people of AI ==  

Revision as of 14:19, 27 July 2017

Contents

Media reports and opinions about future AI

Academic reports about future AI

Business / economic reports about AI

Academic discussions about the likely impact of AI on jobs




  • The UN International Labour Organisation's 2016 report on the impact of automation on jobs in South-East Asia: ASEAN in transformation. This report estimates that 56% of the total workforce of ASEAN countries are at risk of displacement by robots.
  • A study from the US National Bureau of Economic Research (Acemoglu and Restrepo, Working Paper No. 23285, 2017), Robots and Jobs: Evidence from US Labor markets. This reports a regression analysis that looks at the influence of robots on unemployment levels and wages. In the US areas studied, the authors estimate that 'one more robot per thousand workers reduces the employment to population ratio by about 0.18-0.34 percentage points and wages by 0.25-0.5 percent' - and that these influences are distinct from the impact of imports from China and Mexico, the decline of routine jobs, offshoring, and several other factors. (Here's an article on the study in the New York Times.)


Some links from Murat Ungor on AI and employment:

Articles relating to regulation of AI

Articles relating to bias / discrimination in AI

Discussions of the impact on people of AI

AI and legal issues

  • An article about possible EU legislation to classify advanced robots as 'electronic persons' (June 2016)

NZ initiatives

Recent initiatives relating to the future of AI